TCM Discoveries Blogathon: The Thin Man series

I’ve lost count of the number of favorite films I’ve discovered through Turner Classic Movies, the beloved TV network known as TCM, for short. I credit the network with introducing me to practically all of my favorite stars — Cary Grant, Barbara Stanwyck, Fred and Ginger, Myrna Loy. When The Nitrate Diva announced the TCM Discoveries Blogathon a few weeks ago, The Thin Man was … Continue reading TCM Discoveries Blogathon: The Thin Man series

One year, one film: 1934 – The Thin Man

One year, one film: 1934 The film: The Thin Man, dir. W. S. Van Dyke starring Myrna Loy and William Powell Rating: Recommended | Highly Recommended | MUST-SEE Today is a landmark day for the “One year, one film” series: Mourdant Hall gets his last chance to agree (or disagree) with TMP. Hall stopped reviewing films for The New York Times in 1934 and went on … Continue reading One year, one film: 1934 – The Thin Man

Movies that “play with my emotions”

This post was inspired by AurasBookBox on YouTube. Aura adapted a book version of this tag that was going around into a video about movies. Feel free to do the tag on your own blog! A movie that makes me feel happy: The Thin Man series (1934 – 1937) – Yes, I’m cheating by choosing a series rather than a single film (and we’re only … Continue reading Movies that “play with my emotions”

Box Set review: The Complete Thin Man Collection

Reviewin’ the box: The Complete Thin Man Collection What’s in the box? This set includes all six of the Thin Man films, plus a plethora of special features and a bonus disc with documentaries about Myrna Loy and William Powell. DISC ONE – The Thin Man (1934), plus a trailer gallery DISC TWO – After the Thin Man (1936), plus a short, a cartoon, a … Continue reading Box Set review: The Complete Thin Man Collection

Top 9 non-musical comedies of the 1930s, #3

The Thin Man (W.S. Van Dyke, 1934) Why? I love all of the Thin Man films. And, of course, I love Myrna! With a perfect mix of hilarity, mystery and possibly the most fun screen couple of all time, you can’t really go wrong. And given my previously discussed affinity for puppies, the supporting character of Asta only brings up the film’s charm level even … Continue reading Top 9 non-musical comedies of the 1930s, #3