Remaking the Classics: Out of the Past (1947) and Against All Odds (1984)

I never hear anyone talk about the remake of Out of the Past, probably because Out of the Past is practically sacred territory among classic film buffs. The 1947 noir is a film that I, personally, adore. Everything about it is great: the photography, the dialogue, the performances, the drama, the chemistry! It’s a well-made film in every facet. For those unfamiliar, Out of the Past … Continue reading Remaking the Classics: Out of the Past (1947) and Against All Odds (1984)

Remaking the Classics: The Bachelor (1999)

In 1925, Buster Keaton released Seven Chances — a film based on the play of the same name. Just over 70 years later, in 1999, a remake of Keaton’s brilliant marital comedy was released. The Bachelor takes the tale of a man who must marry within 24 hours to secure an inheritance and updates it to the modern day. Jimmie Shannon (Chris O’Donnell) has gone … Continue reading Remaking the Classics: The Bachelor (1999)

Two films, one tale: Walk, Don’t Run (1966)

Yesterday, “Two films, one tale” took a look at The More the Merrier, the 1943 film about a woman who winds up sharing her apartment with two men after placing an advertisement looking for a roommate — her patriotic contribution to the war-induced housing shortage in Washington, D.C. Today, we’ll be looking at the second of the two films that share this tale: Walk, Don’t … Continue reading Two films, one tale: Walk, Don’t Run (1966)

Honeymoon for Three (1941)

Kenneth Bixby is a sensation of the American literary world, having written a number of best-selling, well-received novels. By his side through it all is Anne Rogers, his faithful secretar… WAIT. Haven’t I written this before? In fact, I have. The tale of Kenneth Bixby, his crazed fans, and his secretary’s love for him was told in Michael Curtiz’s Goodbye Again (1933). The roles of … Continue reading Honeymoon for Three (1941)

Remaking the Classics: Cinderella (2015)

This review is part of a new once-in-a-while series, Remaking the Classics, where I’ll be doing full reviews of films that are remakes of classic-era releases and discussing how they differ from their predecessors. We kick off the series with a review of the live-action Cinderella, released earlier this year. A wicked stepmother, a fairy godmother, and talking mice… Cinderella is such a classic that … Continue reading Remaking the Classics: Cinderella (2015)

The Girl Who Had Everything (1953)

The Girl Who Had Everything opens with an evening news broadcast, where Elmer Peterson is announcing that a man named Victor Ramondi (Fernando Lamas) will be investigated. Ramondi is the leader of a gambling ring. Watching the broadcast are beautiful, young Jean Latimer (Elizabeth Taylor) and her father (William Powell). The Latimers live in Lexington, Kentucky, where Mr. Latimer is taking some time off after … Continue reading The Girl Who Had Everything (1953)

The Great Imaginary Film Blogathon: My favorite modern films, re-cast (Part II)

Welcome to Part II of my list of “dream casts” for six of my favorite modern films, complete with terrible MS Paint imagery! This post was written for The Great Imaginary Film Blogathon, hosted by Silver Scenes. Music and Lyrics (2007) Original genre: Romantic comedy Original director: Marc Lawrence Music and Lyrics is a horrifically underrated film, one of my absolute favorites AND one of my most … Continue reading The Great Imaginary Film Blogathon: My favorite modern films, re-cast (Part II)

Period film: Runaway Daughters

Released in 1994, Runaway Daughters was produced by Showtime for their “Rebel Highways” series. It is a remake of a B-movie from 1956. The “runaway daughters” in question are Angie Gordon (Julie Bowen), Mary Nicholson (Holly Fields) and Laura Cahn (Jenny Lewis), three high school friends who find themselves in a bit of trouble. Mary believes that she’s pregnant after “going too far” with her … Continue reading Period film: Runaway Daughters