Classics of the Corn: My Mom’s a Werewolf (1989)

When a film is titled My Mom’s a Werewolf and begins with a folksy opening song that steals its lyrics from the familiar tale of Little Red Riding Hood, you know it’s going to be a Classic of the Corn… and that’s exactly what the 1989 film My Mom’s a Werewolf is.

Leslie is a frustrated housewife who visits a pet store (“Casa de Pets”) to buy a flea collar for her dog. The owner is creepy (and eats mice) but she is for some reason wooed by him and accepts his invitation to get lunch. Little does she know, he’s a werewolf… and when he bites her, she begins to turn into a werewolf too.

(Image: Film Affinity)
(Image: Film Affinity)

Leslie’s daughter Jennifer is, at first, worried about her mom simply because she’s spending so much time with a man other than her husband, but Jennifer becomes even more concerned when she discovers that her mom is morphing into a supernatural creature. With the help of her monster-obsessed friend Stacy, Jennifer tries to save her mom.

There sure is a lot to love about this corny, corny film.

Its best character is Stacy, who is the 1980s equivalent of a Tumblr fangirl, obsessed with all things horror: old horror flicks, magazines/comics, memorabilia, conventions. She “lives for monsters,” and she’s amazing — a wonderful, overzealous addition to the cast of characters.

Leslie is also a pretty fantastic corn-cob character. She seems to constantly be wearing an acid wash denim jacket and spends way too much time talking to herself. She didn’t need a werewolf bite to become crazy — she was already there!

As for the story, some of its elements are so odd that you can’t help but love them. Jennifer and Stacy visit a money-hungry fortune teller, and the interaction goes a little something like this:

Fortune teller: “I SEE THE SIGN OF THE PENTAGRAM ON YOUR FAAAACE!”
Stacy: “Uh… I think that’s just a zit.”

At another point in the film, a thief steals Leslie’s purse and then flips her off.

And even more, as if Leslie isn’t freaking out enough after seeing her new wolf teeth for the first time, her daughter becomes convinced that the wolf-man/pet store owner gave her mom herpes rather than werewolf-ism, because she’s trying so hard to hide the teeth.

Luckily, it’s Halloween, so our dearest Acid Wash Mom and her new teeth blend right in. But Jennifer isn’t convinced. “You look like Grizzly Adams,” she tells Leslie. “That’s not a costume, is it, mom?” …and then Leslie grows a wolf-y coat of hair.

How ever will they fix this dire problem? According to Stacy, horror comics have the answer. Get your holy water, your wooden cross and your werewolf magazines ready! And don’t forget to protect yourself with a necklace of garlic!

Just when you think the problem may be solved, My Mom’s a Werewolf tosses out a super-corny cliffhanger ending (which I won’t spoil). And the whole film is such a brilliant wheel of cheese that this cliffhanger is just the cherry on top.

(Image: Images Bee)
Stacy is one of us! (Image: Images Bee)
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5 thoughts on “Classics of the Corn: My Mom’s a Werewolf (1989)

  1. Ha! Nice one, Lindsey! You make this one somehow sound watchable…and how could you not with a deranged cast such as this: Susan Blakely, John Saxon, Ruth Buzzi, John Schuck, Marilyn McCoo and Tina Caspary from the corn classic ‘Mac and Me’! AND Kimmy Robertson as ‘Pedestrian’!

    And the fact that Stacy uses a wooden cross and garlic to keep a werewolf away reminded me of Count Floyd howling like a wolf on SCTV’s ‘Monster Chiller Horror Theater’!

    Like

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