Those Redheads From Seattle (1953)

Those Redheads From Seattle (1953): 3/5

Those Redheads From Seattle follows a family of – you guessed it! – redheaded women (aside from the youngest, who is blond). The patriarch of the family has moved to Alaska and owns a newspaper, planning to send for them once he settles in and can afford it.

(via moviegoods.com)

After running into some trouble with the locals, he sends a letter which worries the matriarch (portrayed by Agnes Moorehead!), and she decides that the family must join him in Alaska immediately. The women encounter a less-than-happy surprise when they reach Alaska, and struggle ensues.

“Those redheads” are portrayed by a cast of pretty, likable women — Moorehead, Rhonda Fleming, Teresa Brewer. They make up a fun-loving cast of characters, which at times is very endearing.

Catchy, cute song-and-dance routines are also intertwined with the film’s drama. These songs are one of the most promising elements of the film, particularly those performed by Brewer. Brewer is absolutely lovely and steals nearly every scene that she appears in.

While Those Redheads From Seattle certainly pales in comparison to other musicals of the same general time period (or even the same year), it is entertaining nonetheless. I found it to be a bit reminiscent of The Harvey Girls, but less spectacular and with an entire family involved rather than only the wonderful Judy Garland.

It was apparently released in 3-D originally, which I can’t see benefiting the film at all — a possible contributor to why the film is virtually forgotten today.

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4 thoughts on “Those Redheads From Seattle (1953)

    1. As a melodramatic musical comedy, it’s definitely an odd choice for 3-D. I can’t see even the song and dance numbers “popping” like 3-D is meant to. My assumption is that it was just a gimmick to draw in viewers. Apparently it was also screened as a double feature with Singin’ in the Rain at one point, which is another obvious ploy to draw in more viewers. I haven’t been able to find much concrete information on its original release, though, so I’m not sure if we’ll ever know the true purpose of the 3-D usage!

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    1. I’m glad to hear it! :) I always try to step out of the box a bit, especially with films I’m going to review. I love Cary, Audrey, Bogie and friends as much as the next classic film fan, but there are so many underappreciated and forgotten gems waiting to be discovered.

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